21
Apr
Return to the forest...
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#nausicaa
20
Apr

إذا تم العقل نقص الكلام
The smarter you get the less you speak

— Arabic Proverb  (via relaxably)  
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#also known as proof that i am not actually smart
20
Apr

sirmoosenheimer:

suavedoctor:

zethofhyrule:

…And I thought Link liked Mario…

oh my god

This is the best thing.

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20
Apr

I want to portray a slightly different relationship, one where the two mutually inspire each other to live - if I’m able to, then perhaps I’ll be closer to portraying a true expression of love. -Hayao Miyazaki 

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#ghibli #studio ghibli
20
Apr
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#ghibli #studio ghibli
20
Apr
  • (A young girl that is about 14 years old walks in. She gets some looks from our other patrons, as she has bright purple hair, multiple piercings, a leather jacket, and ripped jeans. It is freezing outside and she has a scowl on her face that makes me nervous.)
  • Me: “Hello, welcome to [coffee shop]. How may I help you?”
  • Young Girl: “I’ll take five of the largest black coffees you have, and ten of your ham and cheese sandwiches.”
  • Me: “Okay, will that be all?”
  • Young Girl: “Yeah.”
  • Me: “Your total is [price].”
  • (To my surprise, she pulls out a $100 bill. I am suspicious, and I check to make sure it’s real. It checks out, and I give her a bag with her sandwiches.)
  • Me: “Here is your change. Your coffee will be ready in a moment.”
  • (I keep an eye on her as she stands around glaring at anyone who looks at her. I see her looking at the tip jar. When I hand her the coffees, she asks me about it.)
  • Young Girl: “Your tip jar says that the money goes to you guys. Are any of you in college?”
  • Me: “Yes, I’m going to Rochester Institute of Technology. A few others are in college as well.”
  • Young Girl: “Good for you.”
  • (She pulls out the change I gave her and a few more $20 dollar bills. She crams then in the jar and salutes me jokingly before walking out. I am stunned, and chase after her. I find her on the street corner talking to some homeless people and handing out the sandwiches and coffee.)
  • Me: “Excuse me!”
  • Young Girl: “I’m sorry, did I forget something?”
  • Me: “No, but you just tipped us over $100 dollars. You’re also giving away a lot of food.”
  • Young Girl: “Yeah, my dad is crazy rich. I feel like I can do more if I actually interact with people instead of signing a check to a charity. Every Friday I gather anyone I see who needs a good meal, and buy it for them.” *she smiles brightly* “I may be young, but I can make a difference. I usually hand out flyers for homeless shelters or soup kitchens, too.”
  • (Without another word, she walks off silently. I didn’t stop smiling for the rest of the week. It goes to show you that appearances aren’t everything!)
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20
Apr
n0-face:

I don’t understand. Bob Ross is a legend

n0-face:

I don’t understand. Bob Ross is a legend

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20
Apr

juliajm15:

This is when you realize how many songs this movie has O.O

I think I don’t have an excuse, I just wanted to draw these ‘-‘

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#potential character
20
Apr

mellothemello:

profsycamore:

perhapsmorepersonalperhapsnot:

carrying—my—crosses:

coolguyhat:

American school system

just so you knowthe ‘gifted area’ isn’t much fun either

I saw your tags and I would really like to comment with personal story if you don’t mind.

The gifted area really isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. The children all look like they’re smiling, sure, but let’s be real— they go home and stress and cry. 

I was a “gifted and talented” kid, and it was far from this. My whole life, things were harder because I was expected to be better. I was expected to be reading higher-level books, but the school didn’t allow me to read higher-level books because it was “unfair” to the other students. Teachers subconsciously graded me harder than other students, even on things I was not “gifted” in, like math (a subject in which I have always struggled). We had extra homework and extra tests. In my program, we were removed from regular classes once a week to learn bonus material. Not only were we expected to learn the bonus material, but we were expected to make up the missed material and pass the tests on it; only no one was there to teach us the material we missed, because we were expected to already know it. It was pounded into my brain every day of my life from the moment I started school that I had to be perfect, and if I wasn’t perfect it was the result of some character flaw. If an average student got a B, it was cause for celebration, but if I got an A I was simply meeting expectations. If an average student got a D, it was sad and they needed extra help and it was the teachers fault for not helping them; if I got a B or a C, it was the end of the world and clearly there was something wrong with me. I was slacking, or goofing off, or expecting the teachers to just “hand” the A to me because I was “special”. 

I skipped a grade because I was “gifted.” When I tell people of this, they assume I must be a “genius.” You don’t know how many times I’ve heard people tell me, “Wow, you must be really smart or something. You’re a genius.”

Fast forward to college. I was told I should go to Yale or Harvard. But I didn’t want to. I wanted to go to college somewhere where I could learn but also enjoy myself. People make fun of me for my choice of school because someone as “gifted” as me could have “done so much better.”

This “genius” can’t pass Intro to Biology 1010, because no one ever taught her proper studying techniques—they just assumed she already knew. This “genius” cries herself to sleep over a B in an difficult science class. This genius faces crippling anxiety because she knows she’ll never measure up to people’s expectations of her. This “genius” sometimes cuts herself because the pressure to be perfect is too much for her. This “genius” feels like throwing herself off a building if she gets anything less than a B, because she’s been taught her whole life that if she doesn’t get perfect grades it is some sort of character flaw; she must be a worthless idiot.

I don’t know what it’s like to be in the “Nothing Special” area but being gifted is no walk in the park as the cartoon suggests. We both face challenges; they are different challenges, but they are both challenges.

This is so accurate.

"It was pounded into my brain every day of my life from the moment I started school that I had to be perfect, and if I wasn’t perfect it was the result of some character flaw." god thank you

someone finally fucking said it

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20
Apr
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